Detail View: RIT/NTID Deaf Studies Archive: Poetry class part two analysis of poetry

Filename: 
ds_0031_panarateaching_cap_02.mp4
Identifier: 
ds_0031_panarateaching_cap_02.mp4
Title: 
Poetry class part two analysis of poetry
Creator: 
Panara, Robert
Subject: 
English poetry 17th century Study and teaching
Subject: 
English poetry 20th century Study and teaching
Subject: 
American Sign Language literature
Subject: 
Deaf Poetry
Subject: 
ASL poetry
Summary: 
Dr. Panara discusses the vocabulary, analyzes similes and metaphors, and notes themes from several poems with a Deaf class, including John Masefield's "The West Wind," Robert Herrick's "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time," and Shakespeare's "O Mistress Mine."
Publisher: 
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Digital Publisher: 
Rochester Institute of Technology - RIT Libraries - RIT Archive Collections
Date of Original: 
1974
Date of Digitization: 
2018
Broad Type: 
moving image
Digital File Format: 
mp4
Physical Format: 
VHS
Dimensions of Original: 
55 minutes
Language: 
American Sign Language
Language: 
English
Original Item Location: 
RITDSA.0031
Library Collection: 
Sculptures in the Air: An Accessible Online Video Repository of the American Sign Language (ASL) Poetry and Literature Collections
Library Collection: 
Robert Panara Deaf Video Collection
Digital Project: 
2018-2019 CLIR Grant-ASL Poetry and Literature
Catalog Record: 
https://albert.rit.edu/record=b3955765
Catalog Record: 
https://twcarchivesspace.rit.edu/repositories/2/resources/820
Place: 
New York - Rochester
RIT Spaces and Places: 
Henrietta Campus
Rights: 
RIT Libraries makes materials from its collections available for educational and research purposes pursuant to U.S. Copyright Law. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. It is your responsibility to obtain permission from the copyright holder to publish or reproduce images in print or electronic form.
Rights: 
CC BY-NC-ND: Attribution NonCommercial NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Transcript: 
PANARA: NOTICE, IT'S MONDAY. HA HA! BIG SMILE. NO CLASS FRIDAY. RIGHT. CLASS: YAY! I'M GOING TO WASHINGTON, D.C. [CLASS MURMURING] NO CLASS ON FRIDAY, THIS COMING FRIDAY. YEAH. THIS FRIDAY. SO...GIVE YOU ENOUGH TO STUDY DURING THAT LONG WEEKEND. SOME OF THESE ARE LONG POEMS, MORE THAN ONE PAGE, ESPECIALLY... SO YOU HAVE THAT TO STUDY. WHAT? FRIDAY, NO CLASS. AS YOU READ THAT OUTLINE... REALLY EXPLAINS HOW TO STUDY A POEM. WE STARTED WITH THAT LAST MONDAY, ASKED YOU TO START LOOKING FOR "IMAGES." STUDY OF IMAGERY IN POETRY MEANS WHAT? THE STUDY OF IMAGERY, IMAGERY, MEANS WHAT? WHAT YOU MEAN? 5... WOMAN: SENSE? [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] - SMELL. - [INHALES] PANARA: SMELL, RIGHT. THE 5 SENSES REALLY MEANS... HOW WORDS INFLUENCE, AFFECT YOUR SENSES, THE EXPERIENCE THAT YOU RECEIVE THROUGH THE 5 SENSES WHEN YOU READ A POEM. READ... YET SOMETHING TWANGS YOUR 5 SENS-- ONE OF THE 5 SENSES... SENSE OF SOUND. BEAUTIFUL. WHAT? SENSE OF SMELL, MAYBE, OR TASTE. THAT'S WHAT WE MEAN BY THIS. OK. SECOND, TALK ABOUT... POETRY HAS A LOT OF RHYME, ESPECIALLY LYRIC POEMS... BECAUSE IT WAS MEANT TO BE SONG SPOKEN WITH THE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT OF A LYRE. NOW, THIS WILL ALSO EXPLAIN WORDS LIKE ALLITERATION. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] PANARA: THE LINE HAS THE SAME LETTER SIGNS. "W," "W," "W." [WOMAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] YES. YEAH. ALL RIGHT, NOW, FOR WHAT REASON? ALLITERATION FOR RHYTHM. SO, WHAT REASON? WHAT DO WE USE? WHY? [WOMAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] PANARA: TO...TO WHAT? INSPIRE YOU WHEN YOU READ. WORD BY WORD. BUT WHY ARE WE TALKING ABOUT "W," "W," "W"? WHAT? WHAT'S SUPPOSED TO DO? WOMAN: WIND. WIND. PANARA: WHOO... YEAH. IF YOU SPELL "W," YOU SHOULD ALSO SAY "WHOO...W..." HA HA! IF I SAY, "W," "W," "W," "W," IN THE SAME LINE OF POETRY, THAT'S ALLITERATION. SUPPOSED TO AFFECT THE SENSE, THEREFORE, YOU MUST SAY THE SOUND. SAY IT. "WHOO..." HA HA! "W," "W," "W." WIND, WHALE... "WIND IS LIKE A WHETTED KNIFE." WHERE ALL "W"s PUT TOGETHER, THE TOTAL EFFECT, THE IMPRESSION OF "W," "W," "W"-- ADD THEM UP. "W," "W," "W," "W." THERE ARE 4. ADDED UP MAKES A STRONG IMPRESSION ON THE SOUND "WHOO..." BECAUSE IN THAT LINE, THE POET WAS TALKING ABOUT WHAT? - WIND. - WIND. WIND. WIND. THAT'S THE IDEA. ALLITERATION. ONE OF THE THINGS YOU SHOULD LOOK FOR IN POETRY. NOT ALL POEMS HAVE THEM. SOME POEMS USE IT FOR A SPECIAL PURPOSE-- OTHER THINGS LIKE SIMILE, COMPARISON; METAPHOR, COMPARISON. SYMBOL. ALL OF THOSE THINGS WE WILL BEGIN TO STUDY IN MORE DETAIL. AND THAT'S WHAT THE OUTLINE WANTS YOU TO DO WHEN YOU READ A POEM. IT WILL BE YOUR "GUIDE," GUIDE. WE'RE GOING TO GO INTO THE STUDY OF POEMS NOW. WE'LL TAKE A POEM LIKE "THE WEST WIND." "THE WEST WIND." PAGE 343. 343. [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] YEAH. ALLITERATION. WHY? "W." YES, THE SAME THING AGAIN. WHICH LINE HAS THAT? WHICH LINE? FIRST LINE. FIRST LINE. - HOW MANY "W"s? - 3. 2. - 4. - 4. 4. NOW LET'S SAY THAT. "A WARM WIND, THE WEST WIND, FULL OF BIRDS CRIES." NOW, THERE'S ANOTHER IMAGE. WHAT IS ANOTHER IMAGE? BIRDS THAT CRY. BIRDS CRY. LOOK, YOU GET AN IDEA. BIRDS FULL OF BIRDS' CRIES. THIS POEM TALKS ABOUT "THE WEST WIND." [WOMAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] AND BEAUTIFUL WEATHER. RIGHT. WHY? - WARM. - WARM. YOU SEE THE BIRDS FLYING. AND WHAT OTHER THINGS? WHAT OTHER THINGS? [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] OK, PEOPLE-- WAIT A MINUTE. I'M TALKING ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCE. RIGHT. LET'S SEE THE POEM. PUT THE POEM UNDER YOUR MICROSCOPE. JUST READ THE POEM NOW. READ FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD STANZAS. "IT'S A WARM WIND, THE WEST WIND, FULL OF BIRDS' CRIES; "I NEVER HEAR THE WEST WIND BUT TEARS ARE IN MY EYES. "FOR IT COMES FROM THE WEST LANDS, THE OLD BROWN HILLS. AND APRIL'S IN THE WEST WIND, AND DAFFODILS." NOW CAN YOU TELL ME WHAT OTHER SENSE, IMPRESSIONS, ARE EVOKED? MEANS...YOU ARE INFLUENCED IN SOME WAY READING THE POEM. WHAT OTHERS? TALKED ABOUT THE WIND BLOWING AND BIRDS CRYING. - WHAT OTHERS? - FLOWERS. FLOWERS BLOOMING. WHERE'S THE LINE THAT SAYS THAT? [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] [WOMAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] PANARA: "APPLE ORCHARDS BLOSSOM THERE." BEAUTIFUL. HAVE YOU EVER SEEN APPLE ORCHARDS? - WHAT COLOR? - PINK. WHITE, MOSTLY. PINK. PINK. IT CAN. PINK. SAME AS OTHER CHERRY BLOSSOMS. BEAUTIFUL. ALL RIGHT, "APPLE ORCHARD BLOSSOMS THERE." YOU SEE THAT. BEAUTIFUL. AND YOU ALSO SEE WHAT ELSE? [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] THE GRASS GREEN. "THE COOL GREEN GRASS"-- THAT'S MORE THAN JUST VISUAL. THERE. YEAH. LIKE YOU TAKE OFF YOUR SHOES. BARE-FOOTED. COOL. HOW DO YOU FEEL? IN THE WINTER, WINTERTIME... HURRY UP INSIDE. [LAUGHTER] BUT IN THE SPRING... HA HA! OOH, FEEL THE COOL GREEN GRASS. OH, WARM WIND, SUN... MARVELOUS. AND AFTER A WHILE, YOU FEEL LIKE LAYING DOWN ON THAT COOL GREEN GRASS. RIGHT? [INHALES] YOU'RE SMELLING THE FLOWERS. WHAT ELSE? THERE'S A GOOD DESCRIPTION IN HERE. WHAT ELSE? AH... "AND THE AIR'S LIKE WINE." WHY? PANARA: LIKE APPLES. - SMELL. - THE SMELL. PANARA: YOU CAN SMELL THE BLOSSOMS. LIKE WINE, BUT THERE'S ANOTHER REASON. WHY DO WE HAVE THE SIGN "WINE"? WHY NOT "WINE"? WHY NOT "WINE"? "WINE." WHAT'S OVER HERE? [SLURPS] [SLURPS] WHAT HAPPENED OVER HERE? RED. GOES DOWN AND IT'S RED. HA HA HA! IT'S RED. MMM... WINE. ... WINE. [INHALES] YOU'VE BEEN INDOORS ALL WINTER. INSIDE. [INHALES] FLOWERS. [INHALES] GREEN GRASS. [INHALES] CAN THAT MAKE YOUR HEAD DIZZY? SURE! SPRING FEVER, RIGHT. AND WINE...WONDERFUL! SEE A MOVIE, SHOW A PERSON IN LOVE. DON'T HAVE TO BE IN LOVE WITH A GIRL. CAN BE IN LOVE WITH SPRING. CAN. [INHALES] AHH... MOVIE GOES SLOW. JUMP...OHH... SEE THAT? SAME IDEA. A RUSSIAN MOVIE. "DR. ZHIVAGO," YES. SPRINGTIME. BEAUTIFUL SCENES. THAT'S RIGHT. YEAH. "DR. ZHIVAGO." MAN: ZHIVAGO. WELL, NOW, THAT-- THAT IS ALSO IMAGE THAT AFFECTS YOUR SENSE OF SMELL. "THE AIR'S LIKE WINE." IT IS ALSO A COMPARISON. AIR...EQUALS...WINE. WE CALL THAT A SIMILE. SIMILE. NOT A SMILE. NO. HA HA! LOOK. [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] PANARA: RIGHT. RIGHT. GOOD. HE SAID SAME WITH ANOTHER COMPARISON IN THAT POEM. QUOTE..."HEARTS AS TIRED AS MINE." RIGHT. YOU COMPARE THINGS. OFTEN, THAT COMPARISON SEEMS STRANGE AT FIRST. IF--IF, FOR EXAMPLE, IF YOU SAID TO A SMALL CHILD, BOY OR GIRL, THAT, UM... "THE AIR IS LIKE WINE"... [MAN SNICKERING] "WHAT'S WRONG WITH THAT ADULT? MUST BE DRUNK." HA HA! CHILDREN CAN'T SEE THAT COMPARISON YET. THEY CAN FEEL IT... [INHALES] BUT THEY DON'T GET THE IDEA. THE WIND CAN FEEL WARM. YES, WE GET A COMPARISON. THIS IS LIKE THAT UNDER, UNDER THAT CONDITION, THAT ENVIRONMENT. IF I'M AT SPRINGTIME... [INHALES] I FEEL REALLY DIZZY. YEAH. WE CAN UNDERSTAND THAT, AND THAT IS ALWAYS MADE CLEAR WITH THE WORDS "AS" OR "LIKE." IT'S VERY--"HER TEETH--" BEAUTIFUL GIRL. "HER TEETH ARE LIKE PEARLS." WOMAN: GOT IT. THE SKY AS WHITE. AND PEARLS ARE HARD, CAN BE COMPARED. "HER EYES ARE LIKE STARS." WHY? HER EYES ARE WHITE. MAN: NO, THEY'RE BLACK. AND IF YOU TELL A CHILD, "YOUR EYES ARE LIKE STARS." "NO, MY EYES ARE NOT WHITE. MY EYES ARE BLUE." SHINING...STARS. SHINE, OK. SO THAT'S WHAT COMPARISONS ARE LIKE. WE HAVE A LOT IN POETRY BECAUSE IN EVERYDAY LIFE, DO YOU USE COMPARISONS MUCH? WHEN A BOY... MEETS A GIRL, HE LIKES HER, HE WANTS TO TAKE HER OUT FOR A DATE, BOY... DOES THE BOY SAY, "YOU ARE LIKE A RED, RED ROSE THAT'S NEWLY SPRUNG IN JUNE." HA HA! OR "YOUR VOICE IS LIKE THE MELODY THAT'S SWEETLY SUNG IN TUNE." THE BOY SAY THAT? "YOUR TEETH ARE LIKE PEARLS." YEAH. BOY--WHAT DOES HE SAY? "HEY, YOU AND ME DATE TONIGHT. COME ON. I HAVE A CAR." HA HA HA HA! THINK IF THE BOY WOULD USE A LITTLE BIT MORE POETRY AND STUDY...HMM... MAYBE TRIED TO USE THAT--A GIRL WHO WAS USED TO THE SAME OLD LINE... "COME ON. YOU TWO OUT TONIGHT. HAVE A CAR." MEETS THIS BOY...BOY. "YOUR CHEEKS ARE LIKE ROSES." [INHALING] "YOU'VE EYES LIKE STARS." GIRL... "WHAT'S THIS?" [LAUGHTER] A DIFFERENT-- DIFFERENT BREED OF CAT. HA HA HA! " ...WITH HIM. OK, I WILL GO WITH YOU." WE HAVE TO BE MORE IMAGINATIVE. READING POETRY HELPS YOU BECOME MORE IMAGINATIVE. AND...YOU'LL BE MORE CREATIVE. TRY TO LOOK AT THINGS, REALLY LOOK AT THEM MORE THAN BEFORE. BEAUTIFUL. SO THAT'S THE IDEA. POETRY TRIES TO DO THAT. WELL, LET'S GO ON WITH THE POEM. OUR POEM IS EXPLANATION OF WHAT? WHAT? YOU HAVE READ THE POEM. DO YOU THINK THE IDEA IS ENJOY THE SPRING? RIGHT? IT'S A FEELING, YES. WELL, ANYTHING ELSE? ANYTHING ELSE YOU GOT FROM READING THE POEM? ANYTHING? WHAT? BUT WHAT DID YOU GET? ALL TOGET-- WHOLE EFFECT. WHAT DID WE SEE? [WOMAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] SPRING FEVER. YEAH. YEAH. EVERYTHING WE HAVE..., IT'S WONDERFUL TO BE ALIVE IN THE SPRING. RIGHT? THAT'S THE IDEA. AND PERHAPS THE BEAUTIFUL SOUNDS. "IT'S A FINE LAND, "THE WEST LAND, THE LAND WHERE I BELONG." YOU WANT TO BE IN ARIZONA IN THE SPRINGTIME? NO, YOU'D RATHER BE HERE. HA HA HA! WE HAVE 4 SEASONS TO CHANGE. NICE. THAT'S SOMETHING PEOPLE THERE DON'T HAVE. FOR THEM IN THE WINTER, FINE. WE'D LIKE TO CHANGE PLACES, BUT NOT IN THE SPRING. THAT IDEA, THAT POEM GIVES YOU THAT APPRECIATION OF THE SPRING. LET'S READ ANOTHER POEM THAT IS ENTITLED... "TO THE VIRGINS." PAGE... MAKE THE MOST OF... 21. PAGE 21. "TO THE VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME." PAGE 21. 21. [STUDENT COUGHING] NOW, YOU WERE SUPPOSED TO READ THAT FOR TODAY'S LESSON. WE'LL READ AGAIN THE FIRST STANZA. THE FIRST STANZA, READ NOW, FIRST 4 LINES. "GATHER YE ROSEBUDS WHILE YE MAY, "OLD TIME IS STILL A-FLYING; "AND THE SAME FLOWER THAT SMILES TODAY TOMORROW WILL BE DYING." THE WRITER-- WE SAY THE POET-- IS TALKING TO WHO? "YE." YOU. BUT THE TITLE OF THE POEM... "TO THE VIRGINS" WHAT DO WE MEAN BY "VIRGINS"? VIRGINS. UNUSED. WHAT ELSE? GIRLS. YES, GIRLS, BUT WHAT KIND OF A GIRL? WOMAN. PURE. WHAT ELSE? AH, BEFORE MARRY. BEFORE MARRY HIM. OK. THAT WAS THE OLD ... TIME. VIRGINS. MEANS UNMARRIED. TODAY, LET US CHANGE THE WORD TO "UNMARRIED." OK? HA HA! UNMARR-- HE SAID "UNTOUCHED." TODAY, TIMES HAVE CHANGED. LET'S SAY "UNMARRIED," BUT MAYBE WE SHOULD INCLUDE "UNTOUCHED," YES, BECAUSE THE POEM IS ABOUT THAT. OK? YE. "YE" MEANS YOU, MORE THAN ONE. "THOU"... WHAT? THOU. T-H-O-U. [STUDENTS SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] THE. THE, NO. - OUR. - OUR, UM-UMM. YOU. THOU. FIRST PERSON IS SINGULAR, THAT. THAT. WELL, YOU, REALLY. I, ME, MY, YOU. YOU, THIRD PERSON, REALLY. THIRD PERSON. THOU. THOU. YOU. BUT THAT IS OLD. WE CALL IT "ARCHAIC," A-R-C-H-A-I-C. ARCHAIC. ARCHAIC. DICTIONARY OFTEN SAYS "ARCHAIC," ARCHAIC. ARCH-- THE STUDY OF ARCHAEOLOGY. WHAT? ARCHAEOLOGY. ARCHAEOLOGY. LONG, LONG AGO OLD THINGS AND BONES... BROKEN POTS, FOUND--3,000 YEARS OLD. CALLED "ARCHAEOLOGY." MEANS OLD THINGS... NOT USED ANYMORE. "THOU"--YOU, ONE. BUT "YE"... NOW HE SAYS, "GATHER YE ROSEBUDS WHILE YOU... "OLD TIME IS STILL A-FLYING." WHAT'S THE COMPARISON? TIME EQUALS WHAT? FLYING? HAD AIRPLANES IN THOSE DAYS? WHY? THERE'S A BETTER SIGN FOR THAT. TIME GOES BY. LIKE WHAT? WHAT FLIES? WHAT FLIES? MAN: OH, THE WORLD SPINNING. PANARA: YES. HA HA HA! WE SEE THE COMPARISON. TIME HAS WINGS. ALL RIGHT, IT'S OLD. YOU OFTEN SAY, "TIME FLIES," RIGHT? "TIME FLIES." IT'S A COMPARISON, BUT THEY DON'T USE THE WORD "LIKE" OR "AS." NO. SO WE CALL THAT... MAN: METAPHOR. NOT DIRECT, BECAUSE I DON'T SAY, "TIME IS LIKE A BIRD ON THE WING." I DIDN'T SAY, "THIS IS LIKE THAT." VERY EASY. NOW I MAKE IT HARDER. "TIME IS FLYING." HAVE TO WATCH MORE CAREFULLY WHEN THE POET DOESN'T USE THE WORD "AS" OR "LIKE" IN ORDER TO SEE. IF I SAY... "MY LIFE HAS CREPT SO LONG ON A WOUNDED WING..." WAIT TILL I PUT THE... I JUST INVENTED THAT, BUT I WANT TO SEE IF YOU GET THE IDEA. ALL RIGHT. MY LIFE... MY LIFE IS NOW COMPARED LIKE WHAT? "CREPT." WHAT DOES IT MEAN, THE WORD "CREPT"? DO YOU KNOW? CRAWL. HOW, CRAWL? SLOWLY. WHO CAN ACT THAT OUT? CREPT. CREPT. CREPT. OK. ACCEPT THE WORD "CREPT." OK. MY LIFE IS COMPARED LIKE WHAT? SOMETHING. YEAH. HA HA! OK. YOU GOT HURT. YOU BUMPED YOUR HEAD AGAINST THE TV! HA HA HA! BUT--BUT YOU HAD THE RIGHT ANSWER! YES. SHE SAID IT. COMPARED WITH SOMETHING HURT. WHAT IS HURT? WHAT? [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] WAIT A MINUTE. LOOK. PUT IT UNDER YOUR MICROSCOPE. LOOK AT THE WORD. AH...A BIRD WING. BIRD. YOU'RE HURT. HE HITS THE TREE. AH...BOOM! FALLS DOWN. BIRD... HAVE YOU EVER SEEN A BIRD WITH A BROKEN WING? HAVE YOU EVER SEEN IT? FEEL SORRY FOR HIM, SAD. THERE, THERE. ALL RIGHT, NOW COMPARE ME OR YOU. "MY LIFE HAS CREPT ALONG ON A WOUNDED WING." AND I'M NOT A BIRD, BUT I'M USING THIS AS AN IDEA THAT MYSELF...WHAT, FOR EXAMPLE? [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] PANARA: I'M GETTING OLD. BUT IF "A LONG TIME" MEANS THROUGH A LONG PART OF MY LIFE, I HAVE THAT. WHAT CAN THAT BE? AH! DEAFNESS. YOU CAN'T SEE MY BROKEN WING, BUT I HAVE IT. IT'S BROKE. HA HA! SAME AS YOURS, RIGHT? NOT EASY TO LIVE WITH DEAFNESS. MANY, MANY THINGS WE CAN'T DO-- CAN'T HEAR MUSIC; CAN'T USE A TELEPHONE; WE CAN'T, UM...TALK SMOOTHLY LIKE HEARING PEOPLE CAN-- MANY, MANY, MANY THINGS, SO IT'S FRUSTRATING. DISAPPOINTMENT ALL PUT TOGETHER. RIGHT, MMM. A BIRD WHO WAS USED TO FLYING FREE... SOARING... AS YOU WILL SEE WHEN YOU READ "JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SEAGULL," THE NEXT BOOK WE STUDY. AND NOW... ALL RIGHT, YOU GET THE IDEA NOW, BUT WE DON'T USE THE WORD "AS" OR "LIKE," SO IT'S A LITTLE MORE DIFFICULT TO GRASP. THAT IS CALLED "META-PHOR," "METAPHOR, METAPHOR." METAPHOR MEANS COMPARISON, SAME AS SIMILE, SIMILE, BUT WITHOUT THE WORD "AS" OR "LIKE." OK, NOW COME BACK TO THAT POEM. "GATHER YE ROSEBUDS WHILE YOU CAN, "OLD TIME IS STILL A-FLYING; "AND THAT SAME FLOWER THAT SMILES TODAY TOMORROW..." RIGHT? A COMPARISON. YEAH, OK. WHAT'S THE POINT? WHAT'S THE IDEA? [WOMAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] WHAT'S IT MEAN? YOU LIVE ONLY ONCE. FINE. WHAT ELSE? WHAT ABOUT TODAY? [MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] SEASON CHANGES. OK. "GATHER YOU ROSEBUDS..." WHEN DO THEY BLOOM? ROSEBUDS? SPRING. ROSEBUD. WHY BUD? YEAH. COMPARISON WITH VIRGIN? MAN: AWW, IT'S THE... PANARA: YOUNG GIRL LATE MARRIED. HA HA HA! BEAUTIFUL. LATE MARRIED, RIGHT? HE'S TALKING TO THAT YOUNG GIRL. MAN: HURRY UP. "GATHER YOU ROSEBUDS WHILE YOU CAN. "OLD TIME IS FLYIN' "AND THE SAME FLOWER THAT SMILES TODAY TOMORROW..." YEAH. NOW, WHAT'S THE IDEA? YEAH, THE IDEA IS THAT BETTER GET MARRIED, CERTAINLY NOW, OR TOO LATE. MMM! HA! OK. SO YOU GOT THE IDEA. NOW, LET'S GO AHEAD AND READ THE REST OF THE POEM, THE SECOND STANZA. "THE GLORIOUS LAMP OF HEAVEN, THE SUN, "THE HIGHER HE'S A-GETTING, THE SOONER WILL HIS RACE BE RUN AND NEARER HE'S TO SETTING." WHAT IS THE LAMP OF HEAVEN? [STUDENTS SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] MEANS THE SUN. WONDERFUL. WE SAY, "THE SUN, THE SUN," AND NOW HE'S SAYING... "LAMP OF HEAVEN." RIGHT. HEAVEN IS... BIGGEST LAMP IN THE SKY. IT'S CALLED "THE SUN." THE LAMP, THE SUN. THE MORE... THE FASTER HIS RACE...RIGHT? THE BIGGER THE ... ...HOT. WHAT ABOUT MAN'S LIFE? SAME. WHY SAME? [WOMAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] MAN ONLY LIVES ONCE. WORKS. WELL, HOW DO YOU COMPARE A MAN'S LIFE AND THE SUN? LIKE A MAN'S GROWTH, OK... TO DEATH, RIGHT. BABY. ROSEBUD. WELL, WELL... NOON. FULL OF RED BLOOD. I CAN. HA HA HA! YOU GET OLDER... YOU'RE TIRED. I DON'T THINK I CAN ALL THE TIME. I'M OLD. HA HA! AND LAST... DONE. THAT'S THE IDEA. SO HE'S TALKING TO THOSE YOUNGER VIRGINS. NOW THE THIRD STANZA... STANZA. "THAT AGE IS BEST WHICH IS THE FIRST, "WHEN YOUTH AND BLOOD ARE WARMER; "BUT BEING SPENT, THE WORSE, AND WORST TIMES STILL SUCCEED THE FORMER." RIGHT. "THAT AGE IS BEST THAT IS THE FIRST..." THE AGE, WHEN YOU'RE YOUNG. BEST, RIGHT! YOUTH IS BEST UNDER 30. MARVELOUS! HA HA! BETTER AT 20! BETTER. HA HA! OLDER... "WHEN YOUTH AND BLOOD ARE WARMER..." HOT STUFF! WOW! YOUTH WONDERFUL THING HERE. SO HE SAYS, AND "BEING SPENT..." WHEN YOU'RE FINISHED, SPENT YOUR YOUTH, 20, 25, 30, 35... SPENT! WORST TIME AND WORST TIME WILL FOLLOW. HA HA! AND LESS, LESS, LESS PLEASURE. - SPEAK FOR YOURSELF. NOT ME. I'M NOT THAT OLD YET! HA HA HA! [PANARA SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] [LAUGHTER] OK. JUST WAIT TILL ALL OF YOU REACH THAT AGE. SOMETIMES, VERY INTERESTING. MAKES THE ONE THAT THEY CALL-- WE HEAR THE EXPRESSION "DIRTY OLD MAN." [LAUGHTER] IT'S TRUE! REMEMBER, IT'S VERY HARD FOR YOUNG GIRLS WHO LOOK TWICE AT AN OLD MAN. HA HA! [LAUGHTER] IT'S EASY FOR THEM TO LOOK ONCE AT A YOUNG MAN. ANYWAY, READ THE LAST STANZA, THE LAST ONE. "THEN BE NOT COY, BUT USE YOUR TIME, "AND WHILE YE MAY, GO MARRY; "FOR HAVING LOST ONCE YOUR PRIME, YOU WILL FOREVER...TARRY." "USE YOUR TIME." WHAT'S ANOTHER WORD FOR THAT? MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR LIFE. RIGHT. "USE THE TIME." YEAH, GRAB, GRAB, GRAB! ENJOY, ENJOY, ENJOY! NOW, NOW, NOW! ALSO, THERE'S ANOTHER WORD, A BIG WORD FOR THAT. MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR WHAT? TIME--ANOTHER WORD. [STUDENTS SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] MOMENT. KNOCK ON THE DOOR OF... OPEN ONE...KNOCK. YES. OPPORTUNITY. HAVE YOU HEARD OF THAT? O-P-P-O-R-T-U-N-I-T-Y. OPPORTUNITY. IF I SAY, "USE YOUR TIME," THAT'S YOUR OPPORTUNITY. 20, 25, 30. HURRY UP. DON'T WASTE TIME. OK. THAT'S THE POINT OF THE POEM-- MEANS NOT ONLY FOR LOVE BUT EVERYTHING ELSE. WHEN THE SPRINGTIME COMES, ENJOY IT, GO OUT. [INHALES] ENJOY THINGS WHILE YOU CAN, WHILE YOU'RE HEALTHY, WHEN IT HAPPENS. MAKE THE MOST OF THAT OPPORTUNITY. WHAT ABOUT SCHOOL? SAME THING. DO YOU ALWAYS GO TO SCHOOL? [STUDENTS TALKING INDISTINCTLY] DO YOU ALWAYS GO TO SCHOOL? WHEN YOU DO, MAKE THE MOST OF THAT OPPORTUNITY. LEARN POETRY! HA HA HA! OK. WE HAVE ANOTHER POEM. I CAN READ ONE MORE. ONE MORE, QUICK. "O MISTRESS MINE," PAGE 8 AND 9, 8 AND 9. "O MISTRESS MINE." "O MISTRESS..." 8 AND 9. YOU READ THE POEM. READ THE POEM QUICKLY. READ THE POEM. "O MISTRESS MINE, WHERE ARE YOU ROAMING? "O STAY AND HEAR! YOUR TRUE-LOVE'S COMING "THAT CAN SING BOTH HIGH AND LOW; "TRIP NO FURTHER, PRETTY SWEETING, "JOURNEYS END IN LOVERS' MEETING-- "EVERY WISE MAN'S SON DOTH KNOW. "WHAT IS LOVE? IT'S NOT HEREAFTER; "PRESENT MIRTH HATH PRESENT LAUGHTER; "WHAT'S TO COME IS STILL UNSURE: "IN DELAY THERE LIES NO PLENTY-- "THEN COME KISS ME, SWEET-AND-TWENTY, YOUTH'S A STUFF WILL NOT ENDURE." OK. WORK WITH ME. "O MISTRESS MINE." "MISTRESS" OUT OF DATE NOW IN THAT SENSE. LONG AGO, IT MEANT... UNMARRIED GIRL, SAME AS A VIRGIN. TODAY, IT MEANS SOMETHING ELSE. [LAUGHTER] BUT WE CAN ALSO--IN THE STYLE, CAN MEAN SOMETHING LIKE... THAT GIRL--HE'S TALKING TO HER, MORE LIKE UNMARRIED GIRL. "O MISTRESS MINE, "WHERE ARE YOU ROAMING? "STAY! HEAR! YOUR TRUE-LOVE IS COMING. WHO CAN SING BOTH HIGH AND LOW..." MAN IS TALKING TO THAT GIRL, FLIRTING WITH HER. - RIGHT. HE'S TRYING-- HE'S TRYING TO ARGUE, MAKE HER SEE WHY IT'S IMPORTANT TO LOVE NOW, NOT TOMORROW, NOT NEXT WEEK, NOT NEXT YEAR, NOT 10 YEARS FROM NOW. HE SAYS, "WHAT IS LOVE?" READ THE ANSWER. WHAT IS LOVE? READ THE ANSWER. WHAT IS LOVE? WHAT? TELL ME. IT'S "TIS." IT'S NOT "HEREAFTER." WHAT DO WE MEAN "HEREAFTER"? LATER ON. NOW, YEAH. "PRESENT MIRTH..." WHAT DO WE MEAN "MIRTH"? PRESENT MIRTH AND PRESENT LAUGHING. "WHAT IS TO COME," WHAT VISION, "IS STILL UNSURE." DO YOU KNOW TOMORROW? YOU KNOW NEXT YEAR? BUT I KNOW NOW. YOU'RE YOUNG. "SWEET-AND-TWENTY..." HA HA HA! "YOUTH--YOUTH IS A STUFF WILL NOT ENDURE." WHAT'S THE WORD "ENDURE"? LAST. MMM. YOUTH WILL NOT...FOREVER. YOU ARE YOUNG ONLY ONCE, LIKE THE POEM "TO THE VIRGIN"... "TIME IS FLYING." YOU FIND THAT IN MANY POEMS. YOU THINK OF SEX ALONE, BUT SEX IS NOT EVERYTHING IN LIFE. IT MEANS MANY WONDERFUL THINGS. "HAPPENINGS." THAT'S THE WORD. H-A--HAPPENINGS... BEAUTIFUL GET-TOGETHERS OUTDOORS IN THE NATURE. BEAUTIFUL SEASONS... MANY, MANY THINGS. WHEN YOU'RE YOUNG, MAKE THE MOST OF IT BECAUSE TIME IS FLYING. OK. I WILL GIVE YOU YOUR PAPERS FROM THE LAST EXAM NOW. [SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY] MAN: GOT "F." GOT AN "F." SECOND MAN: OH, NO, NO, NO. [MAN BLOWS RASPBERRY] WOMAN: SEE WHAT I GOT? SEE WHAT I GOT? MAN: AN "A." YOU PROBABLY GOT "A." PANARA: SLOAN. MAN: LET ME SEE. "A." THOUGHT SO. SON OF A GUN. I GOT 85. THIRD MAN: WELL, THE LAST ONE, I DIDN'T FINISH IT. WHEN THAT HAPPENED, I WAS 10 POINTS OFF. WOMAN: DIDN'T HAVE ENOUGH TIME. - RIGHT. - YEAH. WOMAN: OK, THEN...
Notes: 
"This project is supported by a Digitizing Hidden Collections grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). The grant program is made possible by funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation."